HARVEY

CAUSON

GETTING CREDIT

Bristol's genre-bending producer/artist speaks on his latest EP 'Fourth Wall', creating a hybrid of live instruments and experimental production and taking inspiration from multiple art forms. 

What were the main themes you wanted to touch upon in the ‘Fourth Wall’ EP?

I think consciousness on the whole was the main theme around the EP and the idea of the mind being like a theatre in which breaking the 'fourth wall' involves addressing unconscious bias and availability heuristics. There are a few different narratives to the tracks; hypnagogic sleep, the construct of spacetime, spectatorship through to the Cambridge Analytica Scandal.

What was the process of creating the project?

Some of it was built from found sounds, some of it was completely piano based, some of it was born around around a concept or idea and some was jammed out with a band in front of audiences over a few years. Never one set process. 

How important is using live instrumentation as well as electronic sounds within your music and when did you first get into production?

I think synthesising the two is really important to me to kind of create something hybrid. I think I’m quite obsessed with the binaries of reality and construction, the synthetic and the analogue and almost blurring the initial sound objects. I got into production when I was about 16 or 17 but never really thought of myself as a producer as such but the endless possibilities to delve into within production eventually sucked me in to attempt to hone in on a unique sound.

Do you feel that it’s important to have an idea of instrumentation or theory as a producer?

Yes both, I think having a basic understanding of harmony and timbre is really important and opens up a huge depth to different voicing and emotional perception or presentation of music. I think there’s definitely room to have no understanding of theory and playing by ear. I was always drawn to songwriting being something so separate from theory and justified it with greats like Errol Garner not able to read music, but for being able to realise things quickly and in different ways, it’s key.

What was the inspiration for ‘Artifice’?

'Artifice' was a breakup song about letting psychological games ensue and becoming toxic and making it difficult to move on, especially now that we are all so digitally ‘connected’.

 How did your collaboration with Gabriel Gifford come about for the ‘Murphy's Hand’ EP and how important do you find creative collaboration for growth as an artist?

Gabriel has been my flatmate for years. He did a remix of one of my first songs with his old, hip-hop duo Cabrakid before I knew him and then when we moved in we eventually started playing together and that EP just naturally came about through the floorboards over time. 

How do you feel your sound or process has grown since your first project, ‘Frisson’?

I think it’s hugely changed and will do again a lot. It’s become more realised with live instruments and a band which I would like to explore even further with orchestral arrangements. 

"I think being inspired by other art forms ... adds another dimension to music when you have visuals, smells or words and abstract concepts in mind."

"...Try not to be conventional in the way you produce, there aren’t really any rules."

 Top three tips for producers starting out?

Just have fun and make mistakes. Get to know your DAW inside out, it doesn’t matter what you use (limitations make you more creative). And try not to be conventional in the way you produce, there aren’t really any rules. 

 

How do you go about keeping your sound authentic and not conforming to traditional genres?

I think just listening to as much and from all sorts of genres as possible. I think being inspired by other art forms is important as well and adds another dimension to music when you have visuals, smells or words and abstract concepts in mind. Not thinking too linearly. 

 If you had to pick two of your tracks to best show your range as a producer, what would they be and why?

Probably 'Blind Eye', that one has was built around some funky clips of myself sleep talking which you can hear at the start and maybe a remix which is about to come out soon :). 

 

 

 

"I write for film as well and I think music and fashion are inextricably interwoven. Choices within musical production are so heavily based on fashion and popular music"

 Do you take inspiration from artistic mediums other than music e.g. film/fashion etc.

Yeah, as I said previously film is so important to me, from Powell and Pressburger to Hitchcock and Golden Age Japanese cinema. I write for film as well and I think music and fashion are inextricably interwoven. Choices within musical production are so heavily based on fashion and popular music, so it’s important to know how you’re presenting or dressing your work. 

 Being from Bristol, are there any local artists we should be looking out for?

Scalping, Bonsi, Giant Swan, Batu, Kinlaw & Franco Franco, Mercy’s Cartel, Anna Lisa… there are so many!

 Which artists inspired you to start creating music and who is inspiring you today?

I was inspired growing up by James Blake, Mount Kimbie, Bjork, Fka Twigs, Kendrick Lamar, Amy Winehouse, Hiatus Kaiyote, Bombay Bicycle Club but today I’m really keen on Karyyn, Jockstrap and Weval’s music.

If you had to recommend five artists to your listeners, who would they be?

Karyyn, Jockstrap, Weval, Moses Sumney, Sampa The Great

 What’s coming up for the rest of 2020?

Remixes, collaborations, new music, videos, and fingers crossed some sort of show!

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