GETTING CREDIT

KODY GLISH

The Aachen-raised and London-based, self-proclaimed 'pirate' speaks on the release of his latest single '4theKREW', pushing boundaries within his production and the inspiration he gained from moving to London as a teenager.

You just released your first single of the year ‘4theKREW’, how has the response been, so far?
 

It’s been a very good response, it’s a different sound to my previous - so, I’m happy how my krewmates received it. Now I know that no matter what I release my krewmates are going to receive it with open arms because they are already listening with open ears.


What were your initial inspirations for the track both lyrically and sonically?

I wanted a track that all my krewmates could party and drink to on a big fat boat. It was like a celebration of us for us. In the track I’m really just speaking about the experiences when I was meeting girls whilst partying pretty much all-over East London. 

You also just released the visuals, who did you work with on them and how was shooting it?

 

Crolore, a good friend of mine, was behind the lens throughout the shoot. I already had an idea of how I wanted the video to look but Crolore’s style made it really cinematic. We filmed the video over four days, in sun, rain and cloudy weather. It was my first music video, so I had to get used to knowing how to move in front of the camera.

"Your track should feel like a cinematic experience."

What were your main influences for the video?

I actually didn’t have a lot of inspiration for this video. I mainly wanted to channel the energy of 

ASAP Rocky & Skepta – 'Praise the Lord’.


How important is that visual aspect to your music?

It is important but not the most important bit. I think visuals to me should bring lyrics alive or paint the song so good that even if you’re deaf you can ‘hear’ it. Music needs to be very ‘visual’ in my opinion. Your track should feel like a cinematic experience. I guess that is why in my newer material I have a lot of random sounds and FX in my production.
 

Last year, you dropped your debut single ‘Phelps’, what was the process of creating that track?

The song is about this mixed-race girl I met a few years back. We were dating and both of us had insane sexual drives so there was a lot of sexual tension when we got together. Sometimes she’ll just keep me at her place and be at it with me all day. So, I took a lot of what we went through as template for the lyrics to be honest.

"Pirate means to cause disruption and good trouble ... that will give us more freedom and less boundaries." 

When did you first get into making music and what has led you to the sound we hear today?


I started making music when I was 16, but I was into music from like 7. I watched a bag of Kanye West music videos and always wanted to perform live like him. Amy Winehouse, Gorillaz and Arctic Monkeys were also my go-to acts whenever I wanted to feel superhuman. Their attitude and blunt mannerisms is something I relate to a lot. These days you will hear direct traces from all these acts in my music. The guitars from Arctic, drums from Gorillaz, Kanye production skills and Amy’s brutal honesty all runs through my music.

How does having experience in production allow you to maintain more creative control over your sound?


I shape every sound in my music exactly to my taste. When I produce/mix I base everything around how it feels. I really don’t care about rules. My best work usually happens when I play about and purposely do things wrong in hopes of finding a new sonic. Knowing so much about production helps me get to what I want quicker. I don’t spend a lot of time on my production because I know most of the time when things just sound exactly how they needed to be.

What does the word ‘Pirate’ mean to you and why do you identify with it?

 

Pirate means to cause disruption and good trouble. Trouble that will give us more freedom and less boundaries.  Pirates are strong leaders and wanderers in life. Being a strong individual who is hell bent on carving out a new path for his or her people to follow is being Pirate. I call myself a pirate because that is exactly what I am. I like how people look at me bamboozled, yet my story is the one they will remember, because I was the single pirate they met in their life.

 

"I never even knew about British music until I moved here ... grime, jungle, drum and bass were completely new to me ... seeing what the genres do to people here in the UK inspired me."


What could we expect from a Kody Glish project?


A wide spread of bricked sounds and cutthroat honesty. Projects to me are the one place where I let loose and really say exactly what is in my mind and currently going on in my life. A Kody Glish project is certainly going to be a soundtrack to your life at some point.


How did moving around, from being raised in Germany to moving to East London as a teenager influence your sound palette? 

It definitely made appreciate the cultural differences in music much more. Back home in Aachen we used to listen to a lot of boom-bap rap and NY rap. I never even knew about British music until I moved here. Things like grime, jungle ,drum and bass were completely new to me, but seeing what the genres do to people here in the UK inspired me.

 

I love scattering drums and skippy percussion much more now. At the same time, I love how we rap back home, its gritty, aggressive and the beats are knocking. I blend both worlds a lot in my music. I might rap in German soon too, who knows…I’m a pirate I guess I can do whatever I want? Over in Germany we loved dancehall, then coming to the UK I heard skin-out/bashment style dancehall and it was mad aggressive/sexual. That’s when I realised that for being such a ‘polite’ country (apparently) UK gets down grimy and gully at any time. I embrace the dirt and gutter cause I grew up poor, partially in an asylum, it definitely helped me warm up to the UK and take the sound into my music.

Who are some local artists from London that you would recommend?

Greentea Peng, Oliver Malcom, 808Ink, Mason Haley & The Streets.


Which artists first inspired you to get into music and who is inspiring you today?
 

Without a doubt Kanye West. Other than that, I inspire myself. I’m crazy, but I’ve learnt to love it every way.

If you had to recommend five artists to your listeners, who would you choose?


BEAM, Elias, BABYJOY, brakence & Oliver Malcolm..

What’s coming up for 2021?

 

A lot of music, drunk live performance and a wave of pirates at the forefront of our culture. Just wave and sea.

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